Sunday, January 29, 2012

#45 - Blog Once a Week for Six Months

This was the HARDEST challenge I've done so far.  I started on June 19, 2011 and my original end date was December 18.  Unfortunately, I missed some weeks, as you may have noticed.  But I decided, rather than start my six months all over again,  to expand the challenge until I blogged the equivalent of six months.  This put my final completion date at January 29th.

And I have made it.

It wasn't easy, and sometimes it wasn't fun.  But I did learn something about myself - blogging is not for me.  Maybe it's the impostor syndrome talking, but I just don't think that I'm all that interesting.  The pressure is too great with how busy my life is right now.  And I just don't enjoy it as much as I thought I would.

So I have decided that, now that I have reached my goal, this blog will only be used to document the rest of my Day Zero Project journey.  Mainly so I have something to go back to and see my accomplishments all laid out in one place.  It's been real, and it's been fun, but I'm a bad blogger!

Thanks for reading, feel free to keep an eye out for Day Zero posts in the future.

Love, Kelsey

Saturday, January 28, 2012

NY vs. TX

As you all know, I'm a Texas girl.  I've lived in Texas since I was seven years old, and moved up to New York in August 2010.  Since I've been here, I've grown to really appreciate things about Texas and, in turn, really miss those things.  But I've also fallen in love with a lot that New York has to offer.  My typical activities have also changed since living here.  I bring you a comparison of my life in Texas (mostly in College Station, during college) to my life in New York:

Typical weekend activity:
Texas: eating, $4 movies (always!), sometimes dancing
New York: wild brunch, sleeping, going to bars, lots of dancing

Favorite hangout spots:
Texas: Sweet Eugene's (warning - plays music automatically), the 212, Halo
New York: Pranna NYC, Bar Social, Public House

Quick meal:
Texas: Chick-fil-A, Blue Baker, Rosa's, McAlister's, pasta
New York: falafel, cart food, pierogi, hummus

Preferred place to study:
Texas: library annex, Sweet Eugene's
New York: Hauser on campus

Texas: Research Park (CS,TX), Andy Brown West (hometown)
New York: Central Park

Commute to school:
Texas: 10 minutes via bus
New York: 30-45 minutes via car

Extreme weather experienced:
Texas: over 100 °F high temperatures, hurricanes, tornado warnings
New York: lows in the teens, hurricane, tornado, earthquake

Accessories/clothing of choice:
Texas: Toms shoes, jeans, cardigans
New York: heels, boots, tights

Texas: choir kids (CS love), seester
New York: I/O people

I love both places.  And I can't wait to make Texas my home again after I graduate!

When you've moved to a new place, have your tastes and activities changed?  For better or worse?

Wednesday, January 18, 2012


[via Threadless]

Do you ever feel like you're totally making things up as you go?  Like at any minute, your boss is going to realize that you have no idea what you're doing or talking about?  Like you should never have gotten into graduate school?  Like you're an impostor?

You are not the only one!  I spend half of my time wondering how I even got to where I am right now.  "How did I ever get into grad school?"  "Why did they even hire me?"  "Soon everyone's going to realize that I'm making this up and I have no business being here."

This is known as Impostor Syndrome.  Basically, someone experiencing impostor syndrome cannot internalize their own accomplishments.  They believe they are not capable of what they have accomplished, and have done so by sheer luck.  The term was coined by Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes in their 1978 paper, "The Impostor Phenomenon Among High Achieving Women: Dynamics and Therapeutic Intervention" (PDF available here).

In an article on Science Careers, Lucas Laursen summarizes:
They gave this name to high-performing but inwardly anxious women who were among the professionals attending Clance's group-therapy sessions. "These women do not experience an internal sense of success," wrote Clance. "They consider themselves to be 'impostors'" despite scoring well on standardized tests, earning advanced degrees, and receiving professional awards. Early on, this phenomenon was associated with women, a belief that persists today. But subsequent studies, including another by Clance, have shown that men are affected in equal numbers.
So why does this happen?  There are many beliefs as to what causes this impostor syndrome.  This is often seen in individuals who were placed in remedial classes as children, who, in spite of their later success, still believe themselves to be underachievers.  It is also seen often in women and minorities, likely due to stereotypes of intelligence (e.g., "women aren't good at math" and "black students are not as smart as white students").

The author offers suggestions for overcoming your impostor syndrome.  These include keeping track of positive compliments you receive rather than blowing off praise, and simply talking to other people who feel the same way!

So read the articles, and let me know what you're doing to work on your impostor syndrome.  I personally am practicing the art of taking compliments sincerely, rather than blowing them off.  When someone compliments my work, in my head, I remind myself - "yes, I am AWESOME.  I deserve that compliment.  So thank you, friend.  Thank you."

[via Kevin]

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

List Wednesday: Things I Collect

Oh hi, blog.  I'm sorry I haven't written lately.  Have you missed me?  I'm in a bit of a blog funk, so until I work it out, here's a brief List Wednesday post: Things I Collect.  Plus, an owl video.

1. Owls
2. Glass jars
3. Crosses
4. Cross-stitch wall hangings
5. TV on DVD
6. Pretty patterned plates
7. Mugs
8. Inspiring photos and drawings